Posts Tagged ‘DSLR’

11
Jun

Photography – A Saturated Industry


It’s hard to beleive that less than a decade ago, 35mm film photography was still the dominant form of photographic documentation, with the exception of Polaroid camera and Kodak APS (24mm) platforms.

In 2002, digital photography outsold traditional film photography, and ever since then, the photography industry has never been the same.


Shifts In Technology

2003, saw the introduction of disposable digital cameras which fueled the public’s curiosity for the new photography medium, but at a cost-effective price point. Once everyone became more comfortable with the technology, and the price began to drop to reasonable levels, the general public flocked to digital.

However, it wasn’t until 2004, when digital camera resolution and pricing made the medium a true competitor to film quality. Once cameras hit the 6.0MP and 8.0MP (MegaPixel) milestones, consumers could now take and print photos up to 8×10″ with little distortion. This technological feat met the consumer requirements for 95% of the average consumer. By the end of 2004, Kodak announced that it was abandoning the Kodak-branded film camera industry altogether. Nikon followed suit in 2006, announcing that they would stop the production of all but two models of their film cameras; the low-end Nikon FM10, and the high-end Nikon F6.

In the same month, Konica Minolta announced that it was pulling out of the camera business altogether, but would later be purchased by the Sony Corporation just prior to it’s introduction into the Digital SLR (Single Lens Reflex) market with their ALPHA series of camera platforms.

This shift in technology, consumer expectations of quick project turnaround, and elimination of expensive film packs, drove the mass migration of most photographers from the film to digital medium.

The Industry Saturation of Photographers

Unfortunately, this migration while cost effective, also broke down the barrier between professional photographers and amateur photographers, since most consumers could now purchase high resolution digital camera platforms at relatively affordable price points. Previously, the unreasonably high-cost of photography equipment and supplies kept the industry better controlled and monitored, as most photographers knew one another and collaborated on various projects. This saturation of a once elitist-industry, has spurred much suspicion and distrust toward the industry.

The negative reputation focused on the photography industry primarily revolves around the fact that there now exists so many self-proclaimed “professional photographers” in any one area, that consumers assume they are all the same. Therefore, when a client receives unprofessional or poor quality service, they assume this is standard throughout the industry. This of course is an inaccurate judgment, but an assumption shared by many.

Suggestions on Photographer Selection

As a full disclaimer, it should be quite obvious that I myself am an experienced photographer, but even I don’t classify myself as a “distinguished professional photographer,” though many would disagree. The reason being, is that I provide media services (Photography and HD Video Productions) on a side-project basis.

My full-time professional job requires much of my time, and I value having a personal life. This is common, since the photography industry is so competitive, and few photographers can afford to do it full-time.

What to Look for When Choosing a Professional Photographer:

  • Ask to see their portfolio — Most legitimate photographers have websites.
  • Request client references and testimonials — Legitimate photographers should have experience with clients of all types, including organizations.
  • Ask about their equipment — Camera platform, lighting, backdrops, etc…
  • Inquire about their experiences — Ensure that they have the experience in the type of photography you need.
  • Ask about their studio — Full-time photographers typically have a private non-residence located studio. Part-time photographers will either rent a studio, or have a private in-residence studio. Location doesn’t matter so much, as long as their portfolio, references, and studio seem legitimate. It’s fine to request photos of their studio.
  • Bring a friend — If this is your first session with a new photographer, and you’re not comfortable, it’s best to bring along a friend for security. If the photographer refuses to allow you to bring a friend, DO NOT use that photographer.



These are just a few of the things I suggest to all my clients and friends, when in the process of selecting a photographer for their special events. Of course, these are just suggestions, and you may choose to add or omit certain criteria as needed.

Ultimately, sometimes the best choice is the one that feels the most comfortable. If you trust the photographer, and you get along with them well, and their work is of the quality you require, then they’ll most likely be the best choice for you.

I hope this article helped to shed a little light on the transitioning photography industry of today. Feel free to view a brief summary of my Media Production Experience, and let me know if there’s anything I can do to assist you or your organization.



*If you enjoyed this article, or even if you didn’t, please feel free to leave a comment below!

30
May

Summer Swimwear with Emily

Emily W.Emily and I met through mutual friends and we immediately because friends. This weekend I had the honor of shooting with her out at the lake, and the photos

The weather was gorgeous, so we decided to venture out to a few local parks before venturing out to Jordan Lake.

Emily is as sweet as they come, and her personality  bubbles through in her photos. It was so much fun spending part of the afternoon with her, and I look forward to shooting with her again!


Location:
Cary and Raleigh, NC
Model:
Emily W.
Camera Platform: Sony Alpha A-700






View the Entire Album on Flickr.com


02
Dec

Christmas at Bralie's Sports Bar

Bralies Sports Bar - Christmas Photo

The Bralie’s Sports Bar Staff Christmas Photo…

Location: Bralie’s Sports Bar
Camera Platform: Sony Alpha A-700

24
Nov

Fall Shoot with Kate, aka "Alabama Girl!"

Kate W.

My dear friend Kate, finally agreed to participate in a fall photography shoot with me. We went out to one of my favorite shooting locations, West Point on the Eno. The weather was outstanding, and we had a BLAST during our shoot!

Location: West Point
Model:
Kate W.
Camera Platform: Sony Alpha A-700


Selected Photos from Kate’s Photo Session

[miniflickr user_id="27200567@N07" tags="KateWilliams112308"]
View the Entire Album on Flickr.com





View the Entire Album on Flickr.com

11
Nov

Fall Session with Rachel Williams

Rachel W.

As always, it’s a blast working with Rachel. I’m glad she could make her way to West Point from out of town for this shoot. Our goal was to get some really nice shots for her special guy, Mr. “Super Dude” Jason, LOL! I’m sure he’ll enjoy these photos, as he bravely serves our country during these uneasy times.

Location: West Point
Model:
Rachel W.
Camera Platform: Sony Alpha A-700


Selected Photos from Rachel’s Photo Session

[miniflickr user_id="27200567@N07" tags="RachelWilliams110908"]
View the Entire Album on Flickr.com






View the Entire Album on Flickr.com